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Transforming NHS services in East Hampshire

GP Practice

Thank you to everyone who took the time to complete our recent survey. Almost 200 local people completed the survey which sought your views on local GP services. These are being used to help us ensure GP services meet your needs. Highlights include: 

Who replied to our survey?
The survey was completed by 195 people registered at the 10 practices in the East Hampshire MCP Locality. A further 106 people responded and selected ‘Other’ for their GP practice. All of these are from other GP practices so their responses have been excluded from this analysis. Of the 195 local respondents: 

  • 63% of respondents are female
  • 5% of respondents are 24 years old or younger, 38% are 25 to 54 years old, 49% are 55 to 74 years old and 8% are over 75 years old
  • 42% have a long term condition
  • 13% care for dependent children and 12% are responsible for caring for a parent/friend/relative
  • Every practice in the East Hampshire MCP Locality has had responses from patients registered with them.

What did they say about when they feel they need to be seen on the same day?
Most would be happy seeing a GP other than their own (92%) or an experienced nurse (86%) and over half would be happy seeing a pharmacist (60%). The key themes for lack of confidence were people not seeing pharmacists as qualified as their GP or nurse, and being unable to help someone in a shop setting. A small number (15%) only want to see their GP. 

These results were reflected in responses from those who are carers or have a long term condition apart from a slightly lower number of carers for adults (82%) being happy to see a GP other than their own or an experienced nurse (80%). A slightly lower number of carers for children (48%) are happy to see a pharmacist.

The majority (73%) of respondents would be happy to be seen somewhere other than their own practice if they needed a same day appointment. A slightly lower number of those with a long term condition (66%) would be happy to be seen somewhere other than their own practice.

Those who said they would be happy to be seen elsewhere would be prepared to travel up to five miles (47%) with some prepared to travel up to 10 miles (27%). However, a slightly lower number of people with long term condition (18%) would be prepared to travel up to 10 miles and a higher number of those caring for children (67%) would be happy to travel one to five miles with a lower number (6%) prepared to travel up to 10 miles. Responses from those caring for adults showed that less (25%) would be prepared to travel one to five miles or (13%) up to 10 miles but 25% would be prepared to travel 11 to 15 miles.

What did they say about when they need routine advice or care?
Most would be happy seeing a GP other than their own (85%) or an experienced nurse (85%) with just over half saying they would be happy seeing a pharmacist (54%). As before, the key themes for lack of confidence were people not seeing pharmacists as qualified as their GP or nurse, and being unable to help someone in a shop setting. A small number (20%) only want to see their GP. 

There was a slight difference in responses from those who care for an adult with less (76%) being happy to see an experienced nurse but slightly more (60%) being happy to see a pharmacist. Responses from those with a long term condition showed less (77%) and less than half (47%) would be happy to see a pharmacist. Less carers for children (33%) would be happy seeing a pharmacist.

A significant proportion of respondents (63%) would be happy to be seen somewhere other than their own practice if they needed a routine appointment. This was reflected in the responses from those caring for a child but was the response was less (53%) for those with a long term condition and higher (73%) for those caring for an adult.

Those who said they would be happy to be seen elsewhere would be prepared to travel up to five miles (45%) with some prepared to travel up to 10 miles (29%). A higher number of those caring for children would be prepared to travel up to five miles (60%) but less up to 10 miles (7%). Less people caring for adults (31%) would be prepared to travel up to five miles. Less people with a long term condition would be prepared to travel up to 10 miles (21%).

What did they say about how they are seen?
Most (89%) said they would be happy to talk to a healthcare professional over the phone, 39% said they’d be happy to use Skype, 55% would be happy to have a consultation by email, 47% would be happy to have a web-based consultation, and 50% would be happy to have a real-time online conversation. 

Overall these results were reflected in those received from those with a long term condition with less (37%) being happy to have a real-time online conversation. However, less carers for adults (33%) and children (30%) would be happy to use Skype. In addition less carers for children (43%) would be happy to have a consultation by email but more (57%) would be happy to have a real-time online conversation.

The responses for those with a long term condition were lower for each option with 32% happy to use Skype, 48% happy to have a consultation by email, 40% happy to have a web-based consultation and 35% happy to have a real-time online conversation.